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Update: S19-138 Philo Seminar

All the papers for the S19-138 Philo of Alexandria Seminar are now available at my site here: http://torreys.org/philo_seminar_papers/

Philo Seminar, The SBL Annual Meeting 2017

The papers to be discussed at The SBL Annual Meeting 2017 Philo Seminar, that is S 19-138: Philo of Alexandria (at 11/19/2017 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM Room: 103 (Plaza Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)) on the Philo’s De Cherubim, with Ronald Cox, Pepperdine University, Presiding, is about to be available at my website here: http://torreys.org/philo_seminar_papers/

The rest of the papers will be made available as soon as I receive them from the writers.

 

The Studia Philonica Annual 2017 is here!

The 2017 issue of this cherished Annual for all Philo students has been published! A couple of weeks ago

The Studia Philonica Annual XXIX – 2017
(Studies in Hellenistic Judaism)
Edited by David T. Runia & Gregory E. Sterling.
Atlanta; SBL Press, 2017

arrived at my desk. A welcome publication every year!
The volume contains 5 articles, and the Special Section contains papers from the 2016 SBL Philo Seminar on Philo’s De Plantatione. In addition, we get the Bibliography Section, which contains An Annotated Bibliography for 2014 (pp. 185-228), and a Provisional Bibliography 2015-2017 (pp. 229-243), and A Book Review Section (pp. 245-264).

Among the Articles (pp. 1-110), you will find the following studies:
Geert Roskam, Nutritious Milk from Hagar’s School: Philo’s Reception of Homer,
Sharon Weisser, Knowing God by Analogy: Philo of Alexandria against the Stoic God,
Jerome Moreau, A Neocentric Exegesis: The Function of Allegory in Philo of Alexandria and its Hermeneutical Implications,
Yakir Paz, Examining Blemishes: The /Mwmoskopoi/ and the Jerusalem Temple,
Eric J. DeMeuse, Nostre Philon: Philo after Trient.

Then, in the Section concerning De Plantatione, you will find these studies:
David T. Runia, Introduction,
David T. Runia, The Structure of Philo’s De Plantatione and Its Place in the Allegorical Commentary,
James R. Royse, The Text of Philo’s De Plantatione,
Sami Yli-Karjanmaa, The Significance of Reading Philonic Parallels: Examples from De Plantatione.

Philo at SBL 2017

If you are a) a member of the SBL, b) are going to the SBL Annual Meeting this November, c) you might be interested in these Philo sessions and/or lectures. The lectures of the Philo Seminar sessions will be available at my site here: http://torreys.org/philo_seminar_papers/.


S18 – 324 LGBTI/Queer Hermeneutics
11/18/2017 – 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: 210 (Second Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)

James N. Hoke, Luther College
Homo Urbanus or Urban Homos? Philo, the Therapeuts, and Queer Space (25 min)


S19-138: Philo of Alexandria
11/19/2017  9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Room: 103 (Plaza Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)

Theme: Philo’s De Cherubim
Ronald Cox, Pepperdine University, Presiding
Annewies van den Hoek, Harvard University:
Philo’s De Cherubim: Sample Commentary and Translation (20 min)
Michael Cover, Marquette University:
The Logic and Poetics of Association: Secondary and Tertiary Lemmas in Philo’s De Cherubim (20 min)
James Royse, Claremont:
The Text of Philo’s De Cherubim (20 min)
Discussion (25 min)
Break (10 min)
Sean Adams, University of Glasgow:
To Be and Not to Be: Philo on the Difference between Philosophers and Sophists (20 min)
Justin Rogers, Freed-Hardeman University:
A Little Cain in All of Us: De Cherubim as an Introduction to Philo’s ‘Cain Trilogy’ (20 min)
Discussion (20 min).
Business Meeting (10 min).


S19 – 139 Prayer in Antiquity
11/19/2017 – 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Harvard (Third Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)

Theme: The Problem of Identifying Prayer

Jutta Leonhardt-Balzer, University of Aberdeen
What is Prayer for Philo of Alexandria? (25 min)


S19 – 150: Space, Place, and Lived Experience in Antiquity
11/19/2017 – 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Tufts (Third Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)

Theme: Center and Periphery in Antiquity
Reflections on center and periphery, broadly understood.

Jaime Waters, DePaul University, Presiding
Jonathan R. Trotter, Lewis University
Going and Coming Home: Diaspora Jewish Pilgrimage to Jerusalem in the Second Temple Period (30 min)
Sissel Undheim, University in Bergen
Virginity at the spatial turn: Sacred virgins, sacred places, and ideals of immobility of in Late Antiquity. (30 min)
Lee I. Levine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Palaestina Secunda: Jewish Resilience in Late Antiquity (30 min)
Pieter B. (Bärry) Hartog, Protestant Theological University
Globalised Space in Philo’s Embassy to Gaius (30 min)


S19 – 154: Violence and Representations of Violence in Antiquity
11/19/2017 – 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Suffolk (Third Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)

Theme: Precarity and Violence in Antiquity, Part 1

Erin Walsh, Duke University, Presiding
Loren R. Spielman, Portland State University
Domestic Violence in Ancient Judaism (25 min)


S19 – 333   Philo of Alexandria
11/19/2017 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Tremont (First Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)

Theme: Panel Review of Maren Niehoff’s Philo of Alexandria: An Intellectual Biography (Yale University Press)

Ellen Birnbaum, Cambridge, Massachusetts,, Presiding (5 min)
Erich Gruen, University of California-Berkeley, Panelist (15 min)
Gregory Sterling, Yale Divinity School, Panelist (15 min)
René Bloch, Universität Bern – Université de Berne, Panelist (15 min)
Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Panelist (15 min)
Thomas Tobin, Loyola University of Chicago, Panelist (15 min)
Break (10 min)
Maren Niehoff, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Respondent (20 min)
Discussion (40 min)


S20 – 108: Bible, Myth, and Myth Theory
11/20/2017 – 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: Belvidere B (Second Level) – Hilton Boston Back Bay

René Bloch, Universität Bern – Université de Berne
Philo of Alexandria between Greek and Jewish Myth (20 min)
Discussion (5 min)


S20-124: Hellenistic Judaism; Josephus; Philo of Alexandria
Joint Session With: Hellenistic Judaism, Josephus, Philo of Alexandria
11/20/2017 – 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: 306 (Third Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)

Theme: In Honor of Tessa Rajak

Sarah Pearce, University of Southampton, Presiding (5 min)
Loveday Alexander, University of Chester, Panelist (15 min)
John Collins, Yale University, Panelist (15 min)
Martin Goodman, University of Oxford, Panelist (15 min)
Erich Gruen, University of California-Berkeley, Panelist (15 min)
Steve Mason, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Panelist (15 min)
Miriam Pucci Ben Zeev, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Panelist (15 min)
Break (5 min)
Tessa Rajak, University of Oxford, Respondent (25 min)
Discussion (25 min)


S20 – 323: Hellenistic Judaism
11/20/2017 – 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
Room: Public Garden (Fifth Level) – Sheraton Boston Hotel (SB)

Theme: Hellenistic Judaism and Philosophy
Lutz Doering, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Presiding

Horacio Vela, University of the Incarnate Word
The Transformation of the Soul in Wisdom of Solomon, 4 Maccabees, and Philo of Alexandria (20 min)
Elisa Uusimäki, Helsingin Yliopisto – Helsingfors Universitet and Anna-Liisa Tolonen, Helsingin Yliopisto – Helsingfors Universitet
4 Maccabees: Ancestral Perfection in the Roman Diaspora (20 min)
David L. Palmer, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary
Judaic Paideia and Mastery of the Passions: The Philosophical Argument and Use of Scripture in 4 Maccabees (20 min)
Break (5 min)
Teppei Kato, Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion
Presenting Jews as Philosophers: The Image of the Jews in Greek Literature and the Jews’ Self-Image in Judeo-Hellenistic Literature (20 min)
Jason M Zurawski, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Orthos Logos as Orthos Nomos: The Stoic Active Principle in Hellenistic Judaism (20 min)
Discussion (25 min)
Business Meeting (20 min)

Beware the Evil Eye 1

During my years as a research fellow, I met for the first time the use of cultural anthropological models and perspectives in New Testament studies, and found it extremely interesting. I applied some models in my dissertation (published 1995), and in other works, and still find it interesting. In the years since my PhD work, such views have been very much accepted and integrated in Biblical studies. We now take them for granted.

One of the Mediterranean cultural aspects, however, that -at least to us Scandinavians- represents an issue rather unfamiliar to us is the evidence and practice of Evil Eye belief. I have, however, met it some times up through the years, but not always quite realized what it was, or how to read it:

  1. Visiting Greece in the early 1990-ies, when leaving the country, we were given an amulet in the form of a heart, with an eye in the middle. It was said to keep and protect us from the evil eye. I did not catch its meaning.
  2. For some time during my career I had a colleague that had worked in Palestine for some years, His wife told me that,  at one particular time, they had visited the home of some acquaintances there. When arriving, she looked at and praised some flower plants standing at their entrance. When they were about to leave some hours later, she discovered that the plants were standing at their car. They were supposed to take them with them, and it turned out that the reason was that she had looked at them and commented on their beauty.  It turned out it was the role of evil eye at work.
  3. My daughter spent a year at an US High School in 1994-95. At school, which had students from many different cultures, she discovered that looks could be problematic, even evoking aggression. Initially she did not understand the reason why. It was because of the fear of an evil eye.

Now we have been given a tremendous help in understanding the function of the evil eye phenomenon in ancient cultures, in Biblical times and cultures, and in fact, in many life situations of today. John H. Elliott has for many years studied the Evil Eye phenomenon, he has published several articles on the evil Eye and the New Testament (cf. his bibliography here, -up to 1997. See also here.), and now he has published a four-volume work dealing with the Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient world.

I am grateful to the publisher, (www.wipsandstock.com) who has provided me with these 4 volumes, and in a series of postings in the coming months I will present the volumes in some brief reviews. Hopefully, these will wet your appetite, and encourage you to read the volumes for your self.

These are the volumes concerned:
John H. Elliott,
Beware the Evil Eye.
The Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient World.
Volume 1: Introduction, Mesopotamia, and Egypt.
Eugene, Oregon, Cascade Books, and imprint of Wips and Stock, 2015.

John H. Elliott,
Beware the Evil Eye.
The Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient World.
Volume 2: Greece and Rome.
Eugene, Oregon, Cascade Books, and imprint of Wips and Stock, 2016.

John H. Elliott,
Beware the Evil Eye.
The Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient World.
Volume 3: The Bible and Related Sources.
Eugene, Oregon, Cascade Books, and imprint of Wips and Stock, 2016.

John H. Elliott,
Beware the Evil Eye.
The Evil Eye in the Bible and the Ancient World.
Volume 4: Postbiblical Israel and Early Christianity through Late Antiquity.
Eugene, Oregon, Cascade Books, and imprint of Wips and Stock, 2017.

Bruce J. Malina 1933-2017

Bruce.cmalinaThe sad news reached me today that Prof. Bruce J. Malina died yesterday, Aug. 17, at dawn, US time. Malina was professor emeritus at Creighton University, Omaha, USA.

Prof. Malina will probably be remembered by most as one of those who introduced Social Anthropology, or Cultural Anthropology as he called it, into New Testament studies. His books on The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology (John Knox Press, 1981 and later), his Christian Origins and Cultural Anthropology. Practical Models for Biblical Interpretation (John Knox Press, 1986), and his (together with Jerome H. Neyrey), Portraits of Paul. An Archaeology of Ancient Personality (Westminster John Knox Press, 1996), are great works that made Social Scientific ways of thinking (along cultural anthropology lines) both relevant and common in New Testament studies. Think about it, who, if any, knew and applied the models of Honor and Shame, Dyadic Personality, Limited Good etc in New Testament studies before they read Malina? When at the peak of his strength-and popularity- he published a flow of articles and books on New Testament Issues. He got a lot of followers, and a group focusing on these issues, the Context Group , was formed in 1986, and is still active (see also here). In 2001 he was honored by a Festschrift: John J. Pilch, ed., Social Scientific Models for Interpreting the Bible.  Biblical Interpretation Series, SBL, Atlanta, 2001, and a bibliography 1967-1999 of his works is available here.

As for my own part, I met prof Malina in 1987, when being a Fulbright professor at the University of Oslo, he visited the University of Trondheim to present some of his work there, and to discuss my own work as a research fellow there. There and then he introduced me to the world of Mediterranean Social anthropology, and in particular to the model of ‘establisment violence/vigilantism’ which I later applied in my PhD dissertation. I remember him as very kind, helpful and genuinely interested in my work, but also as very self-conscious about his work.

In his later years he cherished some unconventional ideas about present day Israelis, Israel and the Palestinian problem. To some extent this might also have influenced some views in his scholarly works.

But I cherish the memories of a Bruce Malina as a scholar who did New Testament studies a great service in introducing issues from Mediterranean social anthropology. The study of the social world of the New Testament, and even of the Bible as a whole, received insights through his works that we all now take for granted.

RIP

 

 

Great news from SNTS Meeting 2017

The annual Meeting 2017 of the SNTS (Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas) is now over. It was held in Pretoria, South Africa during the days of Aug 8–11. Alas, I was not able to attend the meeting, but here is nevertheless some info as received from the webpages related to the Society, and from one of those who had the opportunity to attend.

    1. There were no main paper devoted to Philo of Alexandria, but at least one seminar paper dealt with him: In the seminar focusing on The Development of Early Christian Ethics within its Jewish and Greco-Roman Contexts , one paper focused on ‘Aristotle’s Three-fold Submission in the Household codes of Paul, Peter, Philo and Josephus’. It was presented by David Instone-Brewer, and the respondent was Christine Gerber.
    2. There has not been any seminar – in recent years- dealing with Philo of Alexandria, but from 2018 – next year- there will be a change in this.  The Society has accepted the establishment of a Seminar dealing with “Philo and Early Christianity”, working for five years, starting in 2018. The Seminar will be led by the professors Greg Sterling, Yale Divinity School, USA, and Per Jarle Bekken, Nord University, Bodø, Norway.

IMG_3144This is great news, and we can now look forward to Philo sessions at SNTS Meetings for the coming five years. The meeting of 2018 will be in Athens, Greece, then 2019 in Marburg, Germany, and then in Rome, Italy, in 2020.