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Bulletin of Biblical Research 1991-2011.

I do think the journal Bulletin for Biblical Research, issued by Instirute for Biblical Research, is containing many interesting studies.
Hence I think it is very profitable to scholars that the issues of the years 1991-2011 are available for free on the net.

Those interested can search these volumes here.

The Studia Philonica Annual 2016 as Festschrift

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The Studia Philonica Annual  XXVIII 2016 was published just in time for the SBL Annual Meeting this November, in San Antonio, Texas. As mentioned below this issue was made and presented as a Festschrift to Professor David T. Runia. It was presented and handed over to him at a dinner in San Antonio on Monday the 24th.

Greg E. Sterling was the main editor of this volume and had gathered 15 other scholars in order to present studies in honor of prof. Runia. In addition, the volume contains an annotated bibliography of the Philo studies published in 2013.

The list of contents can be given thus:

INTRODUCTION
Gregory E. Sterling, A Soaring Mind: The Career of
David T. Runia……..…………………………………………………… 3
Gregory E. Sterling, David T. Runia: A Bibliography of His
Publications, 1979–2016…………………………………………………. 15
THE TEXT OF PHILO’S WORKS
James R. Royse, The Biblical Quotations in the Coptos Papyrus
of Philo………….…………………………………………………… 49
Abraham Terian, Philonis De visione trium angelorum ad Abraham:
A New Translation of the Mistitled De Deo.………………………………… 77

PHILO AND HELLENISTIC PHILOSOPHY
John Dillon, Philo and the Telos: Some Reflections ……………………….. 111
Carlos Lévy, Continuity and Dissimilarities in Middle Platonism: Philo
and Plutarch about the Epicurean ataraxia ……………………………….. 121
Gregory E. Sterling, When East and West Meet: Eastern Religions
and Western Philosophy in Philo of Alexandria and Plutarch of
Chaeronea ……………………………………………………………. 137
Jaap Mansfeld, Theodoret of Cyrrhus’s Therapy of Greek Diseases
as a Source for the Aëtian Placita ……………………………………… 151

PHILO AND THE WORLD OF ROME
Annewies van den Hoek and John J. Herrmann Jr., Chasing the
Emperor: Philo in the Horti of Rome…………….……………………….. 171
Sarah Pearce, Notes on Philo’s Use of the Terms ἔθνος and λαός..…….. 205

PHILO AND THE INTERPRETATION OF THE PENTATEUCH
Adam Kamesar, Philo and Ps.-Longinus: A Case of Sublimity in Genesis 4.. 229
Francesca Calabi, “It Would Not Be Good That the Man Should be
Alone”: Philo’s Interpretation of Genesis 2:18 in Legum Allegoriae………….. 239
Peder Borgen, Alternative Aims and Choices in Education:
Analysis of Selected Texts..……………………………………………. 257
Ellen Birnbaum, What in the Name of God Led Philo to Interpret
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as Learning, Nature, and Practice? 273
Albert C. Geljon, Abraham in Egypt: Philo’s Interpretation of
Gen 12:10–20 …..……………………………………………………………….. 297
Torrey Seland, The Expository Use of the Balaam Figure in
Philo’s De vita Mosis.……………………………………………….. 321

PHILO AND EARLY CHRISTIANITY
Thomas H. Tobin, S.J., Reconfiguring Eschatological Imagery:
The Examples of Philo of Alexandria and Paul of Tarsus …………………… 351
Maren R. Niehoff, Justin’s Timaeus in Light of Philo’s……………………. 375

BIBLIOGRAPHY SECTION
D. T. Runia, M. Alesso, K. Berthelot, E. Birnbaum, A. C. Geljon,
H. M. Keizer, J. Leonhardt-Balzer, M. R. Niehoff, S. J. K. Pearce,
T. Seland, Philo of Alexandria: An Annotated Bibliography 2013.………… 393
Supplement: A Provisional Bibliography 2014–2016.……………………….. 435

stpha-authors2016For various reasons, not all of the authors were able to be present at the dinner; here is D.T Runia, and the attending authors. From left: James Royse, Torrey Seland, Ellen Birnbaum, Greg. E. Sterling, David T. Runia, Maren Niehoff, and Sarah Pearce. In addition, several others were gathered at the event.

 

 

New Journal on Religion

Mohr Siebeck is launching a new  journal these days: Religion in the Roman Empire (RRE). The publisher presents the Journal thus:

Religion in the Roman Empire(RRE) hat das Ziel, neue und integrative Perspektiven auf Religion in der antiken Welt  mit Hilfe einer fächerübergreifenden Methodologie zu fördern und abzubilden. Ausgehend von der Idee der “gelebten Religion” bietet RRE die Möglichkeit, neue, im Entstehen begriffene Forschungsarbeiten aufzugreifen und weiterzuführen. Dadurch können die Fächergrenzen zwischen Religionsgeschichte, Archäologie, Anthropologie, Altphilologie, Alter Geschichte, jüdischer Geschichte, rabbinischen Studien, der Wissenschaft vom Neuen Testament und frühen Christentum, der Patristik, koptischen Studien, gnostischen und manichäischen Studien und Arbeiten zur Spätantike und orientalischen Sprachen überwunden werden. Wir hoffen, die Entwicklung neuer Forschungsansätze anzuregen, die die lokale und globale Entwicklung der multidimensionalen pluralistischen Religionen der Antike erfassen.

The journal is edited by:  Reinhard Feldmeier (Göttingen), Karen L. King (Harvard, MA), Rubina Raja (Aarhus), Annette Yoshiko Reed (Philadelphia, PA), Christoph Riedweg (Zürich), Jörg Rüpke (Erfurt), Seth Schwartz (New York, NY), Christopher Smith (Rome), Markus Vinzent (London) .

Mohr Siebeck grants all readers free access to this very first issue as a sample copy. You can download a PDF of the first issue here: [link].

This first issue contains the following essays:

Rubina Raja, Jörg Rüpke: Appropriating Religion: Methodological Issues in Testing the ‘Lived Ancient Religion’ Approach (pp. 11–19)

Lucinda Dirven: The Mithraeum as tableau vivant. A Preliminary Study of Ritual Performance and Emotional Involvement in Ancient Mystery Cults (pp. 20–50)

Marlis Arnhold: Male Worshippers and the Cult of Bona Dea (pp. 51–70)

Lara Weiss: The Consumption of Religion in Roman Karanis (pp. 71–94).

Jörg Rüpke: The ‘Connected Reader’ as a Window into Lived Ancient Religion: A Case Study of Ovid’s Libri fastorum (pp. 95–113)

John A. North: Roman Funeral Rituals and the Significance of the Naenia (pp. 114–133)

Thanks to Torsten Jantsch, and his blog Verbum et Fides, for this info.

New Journal

RRE-U1Mohr Siebeck is launching a new journal this year that might be of interest to some of you:

Religion in the Roman Empire (RRE)

The publisher presents it thus:

“Religion in the Roman Empire (RRE) is bold in the sense that it intends to further and document new and integrative perspectives on religion in the Ancient World combining multidisciplinary methodologies. Starting from the notion of “lived religion” it will offer a space to take up recent, but still incipient, research to modify and cross the disciplinary boundaries of History of Religion, Archaeology, Anthropology, Classics, Ancient History, Jewish History, Rabbinics, New Testament, Early Christianity, Patristics, Coptic Studies, Gnostic and Manichean Studies, Late Antiquity and Oriental Languages. We hope to stimulate the development of new approaches that can encompass the local and global trajectories of the multidimensional pluralistic religions of antiquity.”

Each volume will consist of three issues a year, each of approximately 130 pages in length. It will include an editorial, five to seven main articles, and book reviews.

Free access to the full text online is included in a subscription.

Price for individuals:  € 49.00.