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Borgeniana; a supplementary bibliography

Two bibliographies of the published works of Prof.em. Peder J. Borgen have  been previously given in the two Festschriften he has received; the present bibliography is provided as a supplement to these.

The two Festschriften presented to Peder Borgen are these:

Böckman, Peter Wilhelm, and Roald E. Kristiansen. Context. Essays in Honor of Peder Borgen, eds. Trondheim: Tapir Press, 1987, pp. 225-233.

Aune, David E., Torrey Seland, and Jarl Henning Ulrichsen, eds. Neotestamentica et Philonica. Studies in Honor of Peder Borgen. Supplements to Novum Testamentum 106. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003, pp. 415-426.

The following is an additional, but provisional bibliography because a more fully bibliography is still to come because some items are missing in the previous ones, and as some of Borgen’s works are still forthcoming. It also does not include interviews, newspaper articles etc. 

Updates:
Updated June 5. 2017
Updated June 8. 2017

2002

Borgen, Peder. 2002. “Avtalen ‘Nådens felleskap’ mellom Metodistkirken og Den norske kirke.” Tidsskrift for Teologi og Kirke 73: 185–98.

2003

Borgen, Peder. 2003. “The Gospel of John and Philo of Alexandria.” In Light in a Spotless Mirror. Reflections on Wisdom Traditions in Judaism and Early Christianity, edited by James H. Charlesworth, 77–91. London: Continuum.

Borgen, Peder. 2003. “Philo of Alexandria as Exegete.” In A History of Biblical Interpretation Vol 1: The Ancient Period, edited by Alan J. Hauser and Duane F. Watson, 114–43. Grand Rapids, Mi: Eerdmans Publishing Company.

2004

Borgen, Peder. 2004. “The Contrite Wrongdoer –  Condemned or Set Free by the Spirit? Romans 7:7–8:4.” In The Holy Spirit and Christian Origins. Essays in Honor of James D. G. Dunn, edited by Graham N Stanton, Bruce W. Longenecker, and Stephen C. Barton, 181–92. Grand Rapids, Mi: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing.

Borgen, Peder, 2004. “Ute-økumenikk og hjemme-økumenikk. Hendelser og erfaringer,” In K.O. Sandnes, H. Hegstad, G.Heiene, og S. Thorbjørnsen (eds.), Etikk, tro og pluralisme. FS Lars Østnor, 269-280. Bergen.

Borgen, Peder, ‚Avhandlingen Das Volk Gottes.‘ NTT 105 (2004) 12-20.

2005

Borgen, Peder, 2005. “Der Methodismus und die Anfänge der Pfingstbewegung in Norwegen: eine auf Thomas Ball Barratt konzentrierte Studie mit einem kurzen Hinweis auf Erik Andersen Nordquelle,“ in P.Ph. Streiff (Hg.), Der europäische Methodismus um die Wende vom 19. und 20. Jahrhundert. EmK Geschichte – Monografien, Band 52, Medienwerk der Evangelisch-methodistischen Kirche. 237-257. Freiburg.

2006

Borgen, Peder. 2006. “Some Crime-and-Punishment Reports.” In Ancient Israel, Judaism, and Christianity in Contemporary Perspective.  Essays in Memory of Karl-Johan Illman, edited by Jacob Neusner, Alan J. Avery-Peck, Antti Laato, Risto Nurmela, and Karl-Gustav Sandelin. Studies in Judaism, 67–80. Lanham: University Press of America.

Borgen, Peder. 2006. “Crucified for His Own Sins – Crucified for Our Sins: Observations on a Pauline Perspective.” In The New Testament and Early Christian Literature in Greco-Roman Context, edited by John Fotopoulos. Supplements to Novum Testamentum 122, 17–35. Leiden.

2007

Borgen, Peder. 2007. “The Scriptures and the Words and Works of Jesus.” In What We Have Heard from the Beginning. The Past, Present, and Future of Johaninne Studies. In What We Have Heard from the Beginning. The Past, Present, and Future of Johannine Studies, edited by Tom Thatcher, 39–58. Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press.

2009

Borgen, Peder. 2009. Vei utenfor Allfarvei (Way Outside of the High-Road). Studier i skjæringspunktet mellom kirkehistorie, personalhistorie og samfunnshistorie. Transactions of The Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters, 2009, 1, Trondheim. A collection of articles.

‘Vei utenfor allfarvei -oversikt-hovedtemaer,’ pp. 7-20.

‘Johannes Olsonius (1607-1684) Theosophus et medicus Bergensis,’ pp.  21-48.

First published in Norwegian as: “Johannes Olsonius. Theosophus et Medicus Bergensis”, Norsk teologisk tidsskrift, 73 (1972) 1-26.

‘Georg Wolff (1736-1828). Religion, handel og politikk i dansk-norsk og engelsk miljø i London,’ pp. 49-86.

First published in English as: “George Wolff (1736-1828): Norwegian-born Merchant, Consul, Benevolent Methodist Layman, Close Friend of John Wesley,” Methodist History, 40 (2001) 17-28

‘Ole Peter Pettersen fra Glemmen (1822-1901). Vei utenfor Allfarvei. Studier i skjæringspunktet mellom kirkehistorie, personalhistorie og samfunnshistorie. Skrifter 2009, nr. 1. Det kongelige Norske Videnskabers Selskab; Tapir Akademisk Forlag, Trondheim, 2009, 87-128.

‘Methodism and the Initial Stages of the Pentecostal Movement in Norway,’ pp. 129-151.

First published in German as  “Der Methodismus und die Anfänge der Pfingstbewegung in Norwegen: eine auf Thomas Ball Barratt konzentrierte Studie mit einem kurzen Hinweis auf Erik Andersen Nordquelle,“ in P.Ph. Streiff (Hg.), Der europäische Methodismus um die Wende vom 19. und 20. Jahrhundert. EmK Geschichte – Monografien, Band 52, Medienwerk der Evangelisch-methodistischen Kirche. Freiburg, 2005, 237-257

‘Nils Alstrup Dahl (1911-2001), Das Volk Gottes,‘ i Vei utenfor Allfarvei. Studier i skjæringspunktet mellom kirkehistorie, personalhistorie og samfunnshistorie. Skrifter 2009, nr. 1. Det kongelige Norske Videnskabers Selskab; Tapir Akademisk Forlag, Trondheim, 2009, 153-168.

Originally published as  ‚Avhandlingen Das Volk Gottes.‘ NTT 105 (2004) 12-20.

‘Ute-økumenikk og hjemme-økumenikk,’ pp. 169-187.

Originally published in Norwegian as: *”Ute-økumenikk og hjemme-økumenikk. Hendelser og erfaringer,” In K.O. Sandnes, H. Hegstad, G.Heiene, og S. Thorbjørnsen (eds.), Etikk, tro og pluralisme. FS Lars Østnor, Bergen, 2004, 269-280

2013

Borgen, Peder, ‘On the Migration of Moses,’ in L. H. Feldman et al., Outside the Bible. Philadelphia; The Jewish Publication Society, 2013 I:951-58.

2014

Borgen, Peder. 2014. The Gospel of John: More Light from Philo, Paul and Archaeology. The Scriptures, Tradition, Exposition, Settings, Meaning. Supplements to Novum Testamentum 154. Leiden-Boston: Brill.

  •  “The Scriptures and the Words and Works of Jesus. With a Response by M. Labahn.” pp. 3–27. (Originally published 2010)
  • “Debates on Expository Method and Form”, pp. 29-39. (Orig. 1983).
  • “The Gospel of John and Philo of Alexandria,” pp. 43-66. (Orig. 2003).
  • “Gospel traditions in Paul and John: Methods and Structures. John and the Synoptics,” pp. 67-77. (Orig. 1990).
  • “The Gospel of John and Hellenism,” pp. 79-99. (Orig. 1996).
  • “John and the Synoptics in the Passion Narrative,” pp. 103-119. (Orig. 1959).
  • “John and the Synoptics,” pp. 121-146. (Orig. 1990).
  • “The independence of the Gospel of John: Some Observations,” pp. 147-164.
  • “God’s agent in the Fourth Gospel,” pp. 167-178. (Orig. 1968).
  • “The Sabbath Controversy in John 5:1-18 and the Analogous Controversy Reflected in Philo’s Writings,” pp. 179-191. (Orig. 1991).
  • “Observations on God’s agent and agency in John’s gospel Chapters 5-10: Agency and the Quest for the Historical Jesus,” pp. 193-218.
  • “‘John the Witness’ and the Prologue: John 1:1-34(37),” pp. 219-238.
  • “Can Philo’s In Flaccum and Legatio ad Gaium be of Help?,” pp. 241-260.
  • “The Appearance to Thomas: Not a blasphemous claim, but the Truth,” pp. 261-274.
  • “Summary: John, Archaeology, Philo, Paul, Other Jewish sources. Johns independence of the Synoptics. Where my journey of research has led,” pp. 275-294.

Borgen, Peder. 2014. “Philo – An Interpreter of the Laws of Moses,” in  Reading Philo. Handbook to Philo of Alexandria, edited by Torrey Seland. 75-101. Grand Rapids, Mi., Eerdmans.

2016

Borgen, Peder. 2016. “Alternative Aims and Choices in Education: Analysis of Selected Texts.” In The Studia Philonica Annual XXVIII 2016, edited by David T. Runia and Gregory E. Sterling. Studies in Hellenistic Judaism, 257–71. Atlanta, Ga: SBL Press.

Updated June 5. 2017

Religio Licita?

The relation of the Roman state to Jewish settlements (and probably also vice versa), is a problem still debatable, and the first mentioned topic is still being discussed in scholarly studies. A collection of studies was published by DeGruyter this winter:

“Religio licita?”
Rom und die Juden
[Rome and the Jews]
Ed. Hasselhoff, Görge K. / Strothmann, Meret
Series: Studia Judaica 84. Berlin/New York; DeGruyter, 2016/2017. viii, 230 pages.89,95 € / $126.00 / £67.99

“This volume examines the pertinence of the designation religio licita to Judaism and its relevance for describing the relationship between the Roman state and Judaism. This question applies not only to Judaism but also to the process of differentiation between Judaism and Christianity, for from the beginning of the 3rd century, the term was used exclusively by Christian writers.” (publisher’s note)

Looking into the book at Google Books you can see the list the contents of this volume, and read some of its stuff.

 

 

Paul and the Gentiles in Acts

The Book of Acts has always been of a special interest to me, not only since the days of my dissertation work but even before. In fact, the very first article I wrote within the field of New Testament studies (and the second from my hand – the first was in Church History…), was on The Speeches in Acts, published when I was a student, trying to find my way.

DeGruyter is now announcing a new volume on Paul in Acts:

Tischler, Johannes Nikolai,
Diener des höchsten Gottes. Paulus und die Heiden in der Apostelgeschichte.
Beihefte zur Zeitschrift für die neutestamentliche Wissenschaft 225. Berlin/New York, January 2017. 323 pages. ISBN978-3-11-045803-9. 99,95 € / $114.99 / £81.99.

I have not seen the volume yet, hence I have to rely on the publisher’s presentation of the volume, which in this case is rather brief: “The Acts of the Apostles include multiple episodes that narrate contentious encounters between Paul and the Gentiles. Its author uses these narratives as an opportunity to clarify the theological position of Luke’s Acts of the Apostles. What exactly is his position? The book addresses this specific question in the context of the thesis that Luke views Christianity as an integral part of Israel, linked to Old Testament tradition.”

 

Christians in Pompeii?

PompeiiFor all of those who are interested in early Christianity, and especially those who have walked in the streets of Pompeii, this book should be interesting reading:

Bruce Longenecker,
The Crosses of Pompeii: Jesus-Devotion in a Vesuvian Town.
Fortress Press, 2016 (Release date: May 1, 2016)

“Archaeologists have disputed the scarce evidence claimed for the presence of Christians in Pompeii before the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE. Now, Bruce W. Longenecker reviews that evidence in comparison with other possible data of first-century Christian presence elsewhere in the Mediterranean and reaches the conclusion that there were indeed Christians living in the doomed city. The Crosses of Pompeii presents an elegant case for their presence, with photographic illustration of the available archaeological evidence.” (Publishers text).

Exciting new book

DestroyerOne of the books I am looking forward to dig into this fall, is this:

Larry W. Hurtado,
Destroyer of the gods.
Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World,
Baylor University Press, sept 2016. Hardback, 279 pages, $29.95

From the publishers announcement:

“Silly,” “stupid,” “irrational,” “simple.” “Wicked,” “hateful,” “obstinate,” “anti-social.” “Extravagant,” ”perverse.” The Roman world rendered harsh judgments upon early Christianity—including branding Christianity “new.” Novelty was no Roman religious virtue.
Nevertheless, as Larry W. Hurtado shows in Destroyer of the gods, Christianity thrived despite its new and distinctive features and opposition to them. Unlike nearly all other religious groups, Christianity utterly rejected the traditional gods of the Roman world. Christianity also offered a new and different kind of religious identity, one not based on ethnicity. Christianity was distinctively a “bookish” religion, with the production, copying, distribution, and reading of texts as central to its faith, even preferring a distinctive book-form, the codex. Christianity insisted that its adherents behave differently: unlike the simple ritual observances characteristic of the pagan religious environment, embracing Christian faith meant a behavioral transformation, with particular and novel ethical demands for men. Unquestionably, to the Roman world, Christianity was both new and different, and, to a good many, it threatened social and religious conventions of the day.”

You can read more and order the book here.

New article on Philo in RAC

The latest issue of the well-known Lexicon, Reallexicon fur Antike und Christentum, has now been published, including a new article on Philo of Alexandria:

  1. D.T. Runia, Philon von Alexandria. RAC Bd 27 (Lfg. 210/217): 605-627 (columns)

The publisher of this famous Lexicon states its goals thus (German):

Das RAC dient als Hilfsmittel zur Erforschung der ausgehenden Antike und des beginnenden Frühmittelalters bzw. der frühbyzantinischen Zeit. Konkret soll die Frage beantwortet werden: Wie wurde aus der vielschichtigen, keineswegs einheitlichen antiken Kultur, die sich seit hellenistischer Zeit in der Mittelmeerwelt entwickelte, die spätantik-christliche der folgenden Jahrhunderte? Die Bedeutung dieser Fragestellung ergibt sich aus der Tatsache, dass diese spätantik-christliche Kultur eine Vorstufe der mittelalterlichen und damit zum Teil der heutigen bildet. Verkürzt wird diese Aufgabenstellung mit der von F. J. Dölger geprägten, im Untertitel des RAC programmatisch verwendeten Formel “Auseinandersetzung des Christentums mit der antiken Welt” umschrieben.

The lexicon article, written by David T. Runia, fulfills these goals in an excellent manner. The article has the following structure:

  1. Leben und Werk (Life and Work): Here is Philo’s works presented and their context of origin (Entstehungskontext).
  2. Nicht-Christlich (Non-Christian): Focus here is on Philo and his Jewish people and his knowledge of non-Jewish authors.
  3. Christlich (Christian): Here Runia deals with how Philo was received and used by the early Christian writers from the New Testament and up to and including Augustin. In many ways, it is a brief summary of his own book on Philo in Early Christian Literature. A Survey (CRINT III,Vol 3: Assen; van Gorcum, 1993).

 

Runia is also the author of another enzyclopedic article, written in French:

Runia. David T. 2011. “Philon d’Alexandrie.” In Dictionnaire des Philosophes Antiques V. de Paccius à Rutilius Rufus  VA. de paccius à Plotin, edited by Richard Goulet, 362–90. Paris: C.N.R.S. Éditions.

 

Two new books on Philo

 

The first of these two books is primarily about Paul, but there is also a chapter devoted to Philo as part of the background material for understanding Paul:

Wells, Kyle B. 2015. Grace and Agency in Paul and Second Temple Judaism. Interpreting the Transformation of the Heart. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 157. Leiden: Brill.

“Following recent intertextual studies, Kyle B. Wells examines how descriptions of ‘heart-transformation’ in Deut 30, Jer 31–32 and Ezek 36 informed Paul and his contemporaries’ articulations about grace and agency. Beyond advancing our understanding of how these restoration narratives were interpreted in the LXX, the Dead Sea Literature, Baruch, Jubilees, 2 Baruch, 4 Ezra, and Philo, Wells demonstrates that while most Jews in this period did not set divine and human agency in competition with one another, their constructions differed markedly and this would have contributed to vehement disagreements among them. While not sui generis in every respect, Paul’s own convictions about grace and agency appear radical due to the way he reconfigures these concepts in relation to Christ.” (publisher’s note)

 

McFarland, Orrey. 2016. God and Grace in Philo and Paul. Novum Testamentum, Supplements 164. Leiden: Brill.

“In God and Grace in Philo and Paul, Orrey McFarland examines how Philo of Alexandria and the Apostle Paul understood divine grace. While scholars have occasionally observed that Philo and Paul both speak about God’s generosity, such work has often placed the two theologians in either strong continuity or stark discontinuity without probing into the theological logic that animates the particularities of their thought. By contrast, McFarland sets Philo and Paul in conversation and argues that both could speak of divine gifts emphatically and in formally similar ways while making materially different theological judgments in the context of their concrete historical settings and larger theological frameworks. That is, McFarland demonstrates how their theologies of grace are neither identical nor antithetical.” (publisher’s note)