Philonica et Neotestamentica

Home » Personal

Category Archives: Personal

SNTS Meeting in Athens Aug. 7-10.

IMG_0271The yearly SNTS meeting was this year arranged in Athens, Greece. What a wonderful place to have a meeting focusing on New Testament studies. While some might suggest Jerusalem as the place most filled with  symbolism for biblical studies, Athens might come as a good # 2.

In addion to that, the conference found place at the Titania hotel, that with its great restaurant at the top floor provided a magnificent view to the Acropolis and Athens. Three Philo scholars from Norway were attending the meeting, and among them, the doyen of Norwegian Philo studies, prof Peder Borgen. Here you see him seated in the restaurant withtwo of his former doctoral students, prof Per Jarle Bekken to the right (Borgen’s left side), and me on the other side. It was great to have Borgen with us, and to see him – in his age of 90 1/2 years- enjoying and participating in the sessions.

On Saturday 11th, there was an very interesting excursion to Corinth and Epidaurus, a trip also enjoyed by prof Borgen, his wife and two daughters.

IMG_0394

The great theatre at Epidaurus

Prof. Peder Borgen 90 today!

Peder foreleser
Professor emeritus, dr.theol, Ph.D., Peder J. Borgen, is celebrating his 90th birthday this weekend. The day is today; January the 26th., but it will surely be celebrated the whole weekend!

Congratulations to Peder Borgen from ‘Philonica et Neotestamentica’!

Wikipedia correctly states that “He is considered a pioneer “within the theological scientific community in Norway and was the first Methodist and the first member of a Norwegian Free Church who took the theological doctorate at a Norwegian university. He was also the first non-Lutheran who became a professor at a Norwegian University when he in 1973 became a professor of New Testament at the University of Trondheim. He retired in 1997, but is still active, informed engaged. His most recent article is about to be published this spring.

Celebrating

vigilantismToday, March 9., it is 25 years since I had my public defense of my Norwegian PhD dissertation. Umbelievable how the years fly away..

The ‘disputatio’ was held at the University of Trondheim, now called Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). My mentor was prof. Peder Borgen, and the two other members of the evaluation committee were prof Niels Hyldahl, University of Copenhagen, and Prof. Ernst Baasland, Norwegian School of Theology, Oslo.

The dissertation was slightly reworked, and then published by Brill in 1995.The volume is still available. Looking back I am particularly pleased that it was well received by both Jews and Christians, as it dealt with a somewhat sensitive issue in the relations between Jews and Christians in the first century CA.

Below is a picture of me, and my mentor. We both were young at that time……….:)

IMG_0231At that time I was an associate professor at Volda Regional College, an institution I served until I moved to Stavanger and the School of Mission and Theology in 2005.I retired in 2014.

 

José Pablo Martín -2016

José Pablo Martín passed away in Buenos Aires on Sunday, January 10 after a lengthy battle with cancer.
José Martín had been associated with the Philo bibliography project for over 20 years. He was a very considerable scholar and will be greatly missed.

José Pablo Martin was a professor of Philosophy, CONICET researcher, Doctor of Theology and professor consultus at the Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, San Miguel, Argentina (UNGS). He specialized in the fields of epistemology and philosophical anthropology, and published on Philo and the genesis of Western culture (1986) and Theophilus of Antioch (2004). He was also Head of the international project Hispanicus Philo.

Anders Runesson new professor in Oslo, Norway

RunessonAfter 12 years in Canada, Anders Runesson has returned to Scandinavia. This summer, he started in his new position as professor in the New Testament at the Faculty of Theology.

Anders Runesson started his academic career at Lund University. Here he took a BA in Jewish Studies, M.Div. and M.A. in Religious Studies, and his Ph.D in 2001. After finishing his Ph.D. at Lund, he worked there at a research project on the Formation of Christian Identity.
Then, in 2003, he was offered the position as Assistant Professor in Early Christianity and Early Judaism at McMaster University in Canada.
“After twelve good years at McMaster I now look forward to working with colleagues and students at the Faculty of Theology in Oslo”, Runesson tells us.

Read more about this here.

2015

Happy  New  Year to all readers.

The end of 2014 and beginning of 2015 has been somewhat tough to cope with as I cought a severe cold, and have been barking like a dog for a couple of weeks now. I am slowly recovering, but I am glad that I am not to lecture in the coming days as my throat  still needs some more rest.

See you in my next posting!

 

 

Enter Fall 2014

Why study Philo of Alexandria? The question might be taken as rhetorical.But it might be good to reflect on it from time to time and make up one’s mind concerning why Philo is important. In fact, the upcoming book to be mentioned below might be read from beginning to end as an endeavor to demonstrate to the reader that Philo is indeed important. Others have been even more emphatic than me in their arguments for the relevance of Philo: Gregory E. Sterling published an article in Perspectives in Religious Studies (2003) with the provocative title “Philo Has Not Been Used Half Enough.” In this article he states frankly, concerning the importance of Philo in studying early Christianity: “I think that the Philonic corpus is the single most important body of material from Second Temple Judaism for our understanding of the development of Christianity in the first and second centuries. . . . I am convinced, that the Philonic corpus helps us to understand the dynamics of early Christianity more adequately than any other corpus” (p.252).
Philo of Alexandria is indeed a fascinating person, but at the same time also somewhat of an enigma, even to scholars who have long tried to understand him, his works, and his position in the social world of Alexandria at the beginning of our era.

My personal life this summer has been marked by retirement, selling and buying houses, packing – moving – unpacking and getting settled in a new place and region of Norway. The scholarly part of me….., especially in the last two or three weeks, has been occupied with proofreading and doing the indexes for The Philo book (!) to be published in upcoming November.
What a boring, tedious and wearisome work! Why can’t anyone come up with a computer program that can do such indexing work? Yes, I know there are some programs that promise to do exactly that, but how to do it with a pdf file? As far as I know, no program offers that ability!

Reading Philo The book as been given the very pertinent title: Reading Philo. A Handbook to Philo of Alexandria, and will be published by Eerdmans. A total of 9 authors from Australia, Canada, Finland, USA and Norway have been engaged in writing the volume, and as the editor I am very grateful for the willingness of these scholars to participate, and for the contributions they have submitted. I intend to give a brief presentation of the various chapters in some postings to come. Just to wet your appetite, you know! The book should be out in time for you to get it at the SBL Annual Meeting this November.

Hence, stay tuned!