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New Book: Hebrews and the Temple

HebrewsandthetempleA new book – published by Brill – also includes some discussion of material from Philo:

Philip Church,
Hebrews and the Temple.
Attitudes to the Temple in Second Temple Judaism and in Hebrews.
Novum Testamentum, Supplements 171. Leiden, Brill, March, 2017. €156,00/$180.00. ISBN-10: 9004339507.

The Publisher presents it thus:

In Hebrews and the Temple Philip Church argues that the silence of Hebrews concerning the temple does not mean that the author is not interested in the temple. He writes to encourage his readers to abandon their preoccupation with it and to follow Jesus to their eschatological goal. Following extensive discussions of attitudes to the temple in the literature of Second Temple Judaism, Church turns to Hebrews and argues that the temple is presented there as a symbolic foreshadowing of the eschatological dwelling of God with his people. Now that the eschatological moment has arrived with the exaltation of Christ to the right hand of God, preoccupation with the temple and its rituals must cease.

I have, alas, not been able to see the book yet, but as I have to be better informed about the recent discussion concerning Philo’s possible relationship to Hebrews (or, rather; vice versa!), I think this has to be added to my list!
From Google Books, I gather that it deals with Philo on pp. 64-71 under the heading: ‘Temple Affirmed: Temple Symbolism in Texts reflecting a Positive Attitude to the Temple.’
It seems to be a large book: 614 pages?

How Hebrews and Philo connected Scriptures

Ken Schenk has a brief posting over at his blog Common Denominator, probably summarizing his own paper from SBL Annual Meeting in Baltimore.

Alas, I was not able to attend his presentation as there are so many interesting seminars to attend that there are always some just as interesting to be skipped. I never manage to be in two places at the same time…..

New blog on Hebrews and Philo

Last year Scott D. Mackie launched a blog on Hebrews and Philo, or as he states it: A blog focused on ancient Jewish and early Christian mysticism, particularly the Epistle to the Hebrews and Philo of Alexandria.
So far there are only 3 posts, all about articles he has published. It is to be hoped that he might find time to post more on Hebrews and Philo.
His last post contains a link to a .pdf version of the article he had published in Studia Philonica in 2009:
“Seeing God in Philo of Alexandria: The Logos, the Powers, or the Existent One?”
The Studia Philonica Annual 21 (2009): 25–47
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Philonic Hermeneutics in the Letter to the Hebrews

Thanks to a posting on Polymeros kai polytropos, I became aware of a new book published on Philo and the letter to Hebrews:

Stefan Nordgaard Svendsen.
Allegory Transformed: The Appropriation of Philonic Hermeneutics in the Letter to the Hebrews. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament, Reihe 2. Mohr Siebeck, 2009.

The publishers own presentaation of the book runs thus: “Scholars have long discussed whether the writer of Hebrews might have been influenced by Philo of Alexandria. In spite of any disagreement, though, academics have almost universally concurred that even if bits and pieces of Philo’s thinking should have filtered through to Hebrews, Philo and Hebrews certainly differed with respect to their biblical hermeneutics. Philo, the philosopher, read the Old Testament allegorically, whereas the Christian author of Hebrews committed himself only to typological exegesis. Stefan Nordgaard Svendsen challenges this consensus, arguing that the writer of Hebrews not only employed Philo’s allegorical method, but also developed his own readings of Scripture through critical rereadings of Philo’s exegetical results. This study sheds new light on the intellectual framework of Hebrews as well as on the letter’s purpose and rhetorical strategies.”