Beginning from Jerusalem

This weekend I had the pleasure of looking into the magnus opus of JDG Dunn, his volume two of
Christianity in the Making Vol 2:
Beginning from Jerusalem.
Grand Rapids, Mi; Eerdmans, 2009.

It is a great work in many ways; comprising 1347 pages, it will have to reside on my desk for a long time. And it is equally impressive considering the breadth of reading it represents, and the many interesting – some expected, other unexpected- viewpoints it presents and represents.

Its outline might give a fairly conservative impresssion; He starts with some methodological considerations concerning writing a history of Christianity’s beginnings, then turning to the first phase; beginnings in Jerusalem and up to the council in Jerusalem. The third part (pp. 497-1057) deals with Paul, and the last three chapters discusses ‘The Voiceless Peter’, ‘Catastrophe in Judea,’ and ‘The Legacy of the First Generation Leadership.’

I think everyone will profit from reading this great book, whether one agrees or disagrees.
Tolle lege!

History and Theology of Mission in the New Testament

Professors Jey J. Kanagaraj (Hindustan Bible Institute & College, India), Stelian Tofana (Faculty of Orthodox Theology at Babes-Bolyai University, Romania) and Jostein Ådna (School of Mission and Theology, Norway) coordinate the seminar “History and Theology of Mission in the New Testament: Global Challenges and Opportunities” in Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas (SNTS). The seminar started its work during the 62nd General Meeting of SNTS in Sibiu, Romania, in 2007 and plans to continue for the next four annual General Meetings, i.e. Lund, Sweden, in 2008; Vienna, Austria, in 2009; Berlin, Germany, in 2010; and Annandale-on-Hudson, USA, in 2011.

The rationale of the seminar is to contribute to the ongoing scholarly discussion and exchange on the issue of mission – both historically, exegetically and hermeneutically. The seminar coordinators have the ambition that new insights regarding the early history of mission (New Testament and Early Patristics) and the interpretation of pertinent New Testament texts will be gained. Current global challenges and opportunities in the contemporary world add immensely to the agenda of the seminar. The seminar will hopefully also be an arena for participants helping each other to understand the centrality of God’s mission and the way in which theologians, New Testament scholars in particular, may be involved in mission in the pluralistic and cross-cultural set up of today’s world.