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Bible Odyssey

The Bible Odyssey is getting better and better as it is being ‘constantly updated’ with new articles and new info.

The site, driven by the Society of Biblical Literature and other partners, has an impressive Editorial Board, and the texts are written by an equally impressive list of Contributors

While not everyone will agree with everything that is stated on the pages, the site is a very useful one for everyone who wants to be informed and updated about a lot of issues related to the reading AND study of the Bible and its world.

I searched the site for Philo of Alexandria, and regrettably, there is not yet a specific article on this personality. He is, however, dealt with in some other articles that hardly could evade the mentioning of the life and works of Philo.

See, e.g., Philo, Clement and Origen; Alexandria, Alexandria and Allegory.

 

 

More about Studia Philonica 2016

As mentioned in a posting below, the Studie Philonica has now been published, and the volume is organized as a Festschrift to David T. Runia. For more about the volume, see the following links provided by the publisher:

  • Download volume front matter, including table of contents and introduction.
  • Download a printable publication sheet that you can put in your files or give to your librarian or bookstore.

A bookreview

On Bookreviews.org., Harold Attridge has a review of the latest book published by Peder J. Borgen:

The Gospel of John: More Light from Philo, Paul and Archaeology: The Scriptures, Tradition, Exposition, Settings, Meaning (Supplements to Novum Testamentum, 154; Leiden: Brill, 2014 pp. xxi + 329. $162.00.

The publisher presents the book thus:

To Paul the traditions from and about Jesus had authority similar to that of the Scriptures: a logion or story served as text for paraphrastic expositions. Such expositions are also seen in John’s Gospel. – It is insufficient to discuss ‘John and the Synoptics’. A better scope is ‘John within early gospel traditions’.- Paul and Philo maintain a cosmic understanding of Jesus and the Jewish people, respectively. Correspondingly, Jesus is seen in cosmological perspective in John’s Prologue. Philo illuminates the role of God’s logos relative to creation and revelation. – Archaeology testifies to the reliability of John’s topographical references. Both John and Philo can combine theological and ideological elaborations with specific geographical references, historical events and religious feasts. The study has brought in material and perspectives which strengthen the view that the Gospel of John was independent of the other three written gospels.

In his review, Attridge concludes thus:

Although the presentation in this volume, based on several previously published pieces, involves a certain amount of repetition, the abundance of comparative data is valuable for any student of the Fourth Gospel. The reading of the cultural background of John in Hellenized Judaism is largely persuasive, although more could be done with the conceptual elements of that milieu. The analysis of the relationship of John to the Synoptics unduly minimalizes the parallels in both form and content, but Borgen’s suggestions will no doubt stimulate further fruitful debate on this and other crucial issues.

 

 

 

The Studia Philonica Annual 2016 as Festschrift

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The Studia Philonica Annual  XXVIII 2016 was published just in time for the SBL Annual Meeting this November, in San Antonio, Texas. As mentioned below this issue was made and presented as a Festschrift to Professor David T. Runia. It was presented and handed over to him at a dinner in San Antonio on Monday the 24th.

Greg E. Sterling was the main editor of this volume and had gathered 15 other scholars in order to present studies in honor of prof. Runia. In addition, the volume contains an annotated bibliography of the Philo studies published in 2013.

The list of contents can be given thus:

INTRODUCTION
Gregory E. Sterling, A Soaring Mind: The Career of
David T. Runia……..…………………………………………………… 3
Gregory E. Sterling, David T. Runia: A Bibliography of His
Publications, 1979–2016…………………………………………………. 15
THE TEXT OF PHILO’S WORKS
James R. Royse, The Biblical Quotations in the Coptos Papyrus
of Philo………….…………………………………………………… 49
Abraham Terian, Philonis De visione trium angelorum ad Abraham:
A New Translation of the Mistitled De Deo.………………………………… 77

PHILO AND HELLENISTIC PHILOSOPHY
John Dillon, Philo and the Telos: Some Reflections ……………………….. 111
Carlos Lévy, Continuity and Dissimilarities in Middle Platonism: Philo
and Plutarch about the Epicurean ataraxia ……………………………….. 121
Gregory E. Sterling, When East and West Meet: Eastern Religions
and Western Philosophy in Philo of Alexandria and Plutarch of
Chaeronea ……………………………………………………………. 137
Jaap Mansfeld, Theodoret of Cyrrhus’s Therapy of Greek Diseases
as a Source for the Aëtian Placita ……………………………………… 151

PHILO AND THE WORLD OF ROME
Annewies van den Hoek and John J. Herrmann Jr., Chasing the
Emperor: Philo in the Horti of Rome…………….……………………….. 171
Sarah Pearce, Notes on Philo’s Use of the Terms ἔθνος and λαός..…….. 205

PHILO AND THE INTERPRETATION OF THE PENTATEUCH
Adam Kamesar, Philo and Ps.-Longinus: A Case of Sublimity in Genesis 4.. 229
Francesca Calabi, “It Would Not Be Good That the Man Should be
Alone”: Philo’s Interpretation of Genesis 2:18 in Legum Allegoriae………….. 239
Peder Borgen, Alternative Aims and Choices in Education:
Analysis of Selected Texts..……………………………………………. 257
Ellen Birnbaum, What in the Name of God Led Philo to Interpret
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as Learning, Nature, and Practice? 273
Albert C. Geljon, Abraham in Egypt: Philo’s Interpretation of
Gen 12:10–20 …..……………………………………………………………….. 297
Torrey Seland, The Expository Use of the Balaam Figure in
Philo’s De vita Mosis.……………………………………………….. 321

PHILO AND EARLY CHRISTIANITY
Thomas H. Tobin, S.J., Reconfiguring Eschatological Imagery:
The Examples of Philo of Alexandria and Paul of Tarsus …………………… 351
Maren R. Niehoff, Justin’s Timaeus in Light of Philo’s……………………. 375

BIBLIOGRAPHY SECTION
D. T. Runia, M. Alesso, K. Berthelot, E. Birnbaum, A. C. Geljon,
H. M. Keizer, J. Leonhardt-Balzer, M. R. Niehoff, S. J. K. Pearce,
T. Seland, Philo of Alexandria: An Annotated Bibliography 2013.………… 393
Supplement: A Provisional Bibliography 2014–2016.……………………….. 435

stpha-authors2016For various reasons, not all of the authors were able to be present at the dinner; here is D.T Runia, and the attending authors. From left: James Royse, Torrey Seland, Ellen Birnbaum, Greg. E. Sterling, David T. Runia, Maren Niehoff, and Sarah Pearce. In addition, several others were gathered at the event.

 

 

Examples of Mimicry and Hybridity in Philo’s writings

My study from 2010, ‘Colony’ and ‘metropolis’ in Philo. Examples of Mimicry and Hybridity in Philo’s writing back from the Empire? Études platoniciennes, 7.2010, 11-33, is now available on the web at this link.

Philo conference in UK

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Summertime  is the when several conferences related to biblical studies are held, and the summer of 2016 is no exception. My own participation in such conferences this summer , alas, has been non-existent, due to several reasons.
One of those I would have liked to attend was the Philo symposium held in UK last July.

Sean Adams has written the following comment on this conference:
“The first UK Philo colloquium was held at the University of Glasgow on 21 July 2016. In this one-day event, twenty scholars from three continents (Europe, Africa, North America) came together to hear nine papers on various aspects of Philo scholarship (listed below). Of particular note was the presentation by James R. Royse (cf. picture to left), who shared his findings and new textual emendations resulting from his recent work on the Coptos papyrus in Paris. Future colloquia are expected to run bi-annually, with the next meeting to be held at King’s College London in 2018 and Oxford in 2020.

Presenters and Papers include: Joan Taylor (KCL), ‘The Therapeutae, Gender, and the Synagogue’; Erlend MacGillivray (Aberdeen), ‘Primitivism in Philo of Alexandria’s Thought and his Perception of Non-Jews’; Mina Monier (KCL), ‘Reception of Philo in Epistle of Barnabas’; Ekaterina Matusova (Tübingen), ‘Cognizing God in Philo: between Hellenistic Platonism and Parabiblical Texts’; Sean A. Adams (Glasgow), ‘Philo’s Literary Forms and Genre Adaptations’; Joshua Carroll (Aberdeen), ‘Philo’s Education in De congressu’; Elisa Uusimäki (Helsinki), ‘Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises in the Context of Philo’s Pedagogical Programme’; James R. Royse (Claremont), ‘Philo’s Biblical Quotations according to the Coptos Papyrus (Cohn-Wendland’s “Pap”) with Some Newly Discovered Readings’; Hindy Najman (Oxford), ‘Transcendence, Immanence, and Revelation in Philo of Alexandria’.”

The First UK Philo Colloquium

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Date: 21 July 2016
Time: 10-5
Location:  The University of Glasgow,
Theology and Religious Studies Building,
No. 4 The Square, G12 8QQ

The event is free to attend, though please email Sean Adams to register (adams.sean@gmail.com)

For more information, visit: https://philocolloquium.wordpress.com/

        Programme:

10:00 – Welcome and Introductions
10:20 – Joan Taylor (KCL) – ‘The Therapeutae, Gender and the Synagogue’
10:55 – Erlend MacGillivray (Aberdeen) – ‘Primitivism in Philo of Alexandria’s Thought and his Perception of Non-Jews’

11:30 – Coffee/tea

11:50 – Mina Monier (KCL) – Reception of Philo in Barnabas
12:25 – Ekaterina Matusova (Tübingen) – ‘Cognizing God in Philo: between Hellenistic Platonism and Parabiblical Texts’

1:00 – Lunch

2:00 – Sean Adams (Glasgow) – ‘Philo’s Literary Forms and Genre Adaptations
2:30 – Joshua Carroll (Aberdeen) – Philo’s education
3:00 – Elisa Uusimäki (Helsinki) – ‘Jacob’s Spiritual Exercises in the Context of Philo’s Pedagogical Programme’

3:30 – Coffee/tea

3:50 – James R. Royce (Claremont) – ‘Philo’s Biblical Quotations according to the Coptos Papyrus (Cohn-Wendland’s “Pap”) with Some Newly Discovered Readings’
4:20 – Hindy Najman (Oxford) – Trancendence, Immanence, and Revelation in Philo of Alexandria

4:50 – Future Planning

5:00 Close of event