Initiation into the Mysteries

Bremmer, Jan N., Initiation into the Mysteries of the Ancient World (De Gruyter, 2013), has been published now as an ‘Open Access’ book, thus downloadable to read (thanks to Larry  Hurtado for the info).

The publisher states: “It gives a ‘thick description’ of the major Mysteries, not only of the famous Eleusinian Mysteries, but also those located at the interface of Greece and Anatolia: the Mysteries of Samothrace, Imbros and Lemnos as well as those of the Corybants. It then proceeds to look at the Orphic-Bacchic Mysteries, which have become increasingly better understood due to the many discoveries of new texts in the recent times. Having looked at classical Greece we move on to the Roman Empire, where we study not only the lesser Mysteries, which we know especially from Pausanias, but also the new ones of Isis and Mithras. We conclude our book with a discussion of the possible influence of the Mysteries on emerging Christianity.”

The book kan be  downloaded in chapters (as pdf files), or as a whole.

Electronic Resources for Classicists

A tremendous resource is available at this address: Electronic Resources for Classicists
Developed and maintained by Maria Pantelia, University of California, Irvine. It has been added to my Resource Pages for Biblical Studies, in the subsection called Resources for studying the Greco-Roman world.

It contains links to electronic journals, bibliographical indices, course materials, e-text archives etc., etc.

New URL for TLG

The cryptic reference in the headline above refers to the fact that the site for Textus Lingua Graaecae (TLG) has received a new address, a new URL; now you can find the TLG at

http://stephanus.tlg.uci.edu/index.php

Those who have worked with the ancient Greec literature, Philo included, will – hopefully – know the TLG. It is a tremendous source for searching and reading the ancient Greek literature between ca. 600 BCE and 600 CE.

The TLG Director says about the new site:

We are delighted to announce the release of the new TLG web site. Equipped with an expanded search engine and a host of new features, the new TLG represents a marked change from the earlier version.

Canon and text searches have been redesigned and expanded and new tools have been added. Included in this release are n-grams and statistical analysis, two research projects that we will continue to develop for years to come.

The new site will run concurrently with the previous version to allow users time to explore the new features.

Have a look at the site yourself; at the page you can read about the history of the TLG and a lot of other interesting info; and you can also go to the search function.