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More Jesus Studies

November 2010
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More Jesus studies seem to be constantly popping up. Those who predicted their end has been proven totally wrong. Studies of the historical Jesus still fascinate, challenge, inspire and provoke.

A couple of days ago I received my copy of Dale C. Allison’s Constructing Jesus. And no a copy of M. Casey’s Jesus of Nazareth: An Independent Historian’s Account of His Life and Teaching is on its way to my mailbox. I am looking forward to spend some time in the new year getting updated on the recent Jesus research via these books.May be I even will have a look at Jesus Legend, The: A Case for the Historical Reliability of the Synoptic Jesus Tradition

I have decided I will start with Casey’s book because it seems to be the most traditional of these two. I simply want to get updated on how Casey describes the present research situation. I am sure he also will present some surprises along the way. Then I will read Allison, which according to all the praises by its publisher promoting the book is the most innovative in recent years.

But my main focus will be, when the new year has begun, Philo of Alexandria. A hard and consistent focus on Philo and his social world are the main focus of my research agenda for 2011.

But before that, I still have to make my way through some lectures and a pile of term papers are to be marked. December is not going to be a slow down month….


3 Comments

  1. Rich Griese says:

    You might look at http://vridar.wordpress.com/, I know that he has written multiple reviews of th Casey work. I think he has also talked about Allison too, but I may have dreamed that. In any event. I am also interested in early Christianity history. Recently been feeling that a great deal of what we think in terms of Christianity came from the time we associate with Irenaeus. Started studying the historical Jesus originally, and then moved one to the early gospel periods. Couldn’t find much data. I mean, verifiable data. Yet when we move into the later patristic periods, I think we start to see Christianity as something we can talk about historically. Thought I would leave a note to help you out with the reference above, but also to just say hi, and indicate that I am interested in meeting others intersted in this kind of thing, and love the idea of having an number of internet pen pals that talk on the subject via email. If you want to talk further, feel free to post me, and perhaps we can chat a bit.

    Cheers! RichGriese@gmail.com

  2. John says:

    These are really interesting new Jesus books. I’ve always liked Dale Allison’s work.

    BTW, has this year’s Studia Philonica appeared yet?

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